Description
Graphs
SDGs

Indicator Values

130.20 - 130.27:
 
130.27 - 130.33:
 
130.33 - 130.40:
 

Consumer Price Index

Consumer price index measures changes in how much we can buy with a certain amount of money.

Data Source

Statistics Canada CANSIM table 326-0021

Rationale and Connections

The CPI is a widely used indicator of changes in consumer prices and the rate of inflation.

The most recent data for this indicator was made available in 2017. This data is updated annually as it becomes available.

Measurement and Limitations

CPI is calculated by comparing the cost of a fixed basket about 600 of goods and services purchased by consumers. As the basket contains a fixed set of goods and services, the index reflects only price change. Data is collected directly from survey respondents (who are required to respond), administrative files, other Statistics Canada surveys, and other sources. According to Statistics Canada: Generally, the factors affecting the quality of the CPI include: (i) The size and composition of the price samples of goods and services and outlets; (ii) The accuracy of the expenditure estimates used to assign weights; (iii) The frequency and speed of updating of the contents and weights of the CPI basket; (iv) The effectiveness of error detection and correction, and imputation methods for missing data; and (v) The application of appropriate methods of adjusting for quality change of goods and services in the CPI sample.

References

Stats Canada (n.d.) Retrieved from: http://www23.statcan.gc.ca/imdb/p2SV.pl?Function=getSurvey&SDDS=2301&Item_Id=1565&lang=en

Consumer Price Index

Consumer price index measures changes in how much we can buy with a certain amount of money.
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Consumer Price Index Sustainable Development Goals

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere
1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere

1. End poverty in all its forms everywhere

Extreme poverty rates have been cut by more than half since 1990. While this is a remarkable achievement, one in five people in developing regions still live on less than $1.90 a day, and there are millions more who make little more than this daily amount, plus many people risk slipping back into poverty.

Poverty is more than the lack of income and resources to ensure a sustainable livelihood. Its manifestations include hunger and malnutrition, limited access to education and other basic services, social discrimination and exclusion as well as the lack of participation in decision-making. Economic growth must be inclusive to provide sustainable jobs and promote equality.

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all
8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

8. Promote inclusive and sustainable economic growth, employment and decent work for all

Roughly half the world’s population still lives on the equivalent of about US$2 a day. And in too many places, having a job doesn’t guarantee the ability to escape from poverty. This slow and uneven progress requires us to rethink and retool our economic and social policies aimed at eradicating poverty.

A continued lack of decent work opportunities, insufficient investments and under-consumption lead to an erosion of the basic social contract underlying democratic societies: that all must share in progress. . The creation of quality jobs will remain a major challenge for almost all economies well beyond 2015.

Sustainable economic growth will require societies to create the conditions that allow people to have quality jobs that stimulate the economy while not harming the environment. Job opportunities and decent working conditions are also required for the whole working age population.